What to do with Steam-A-Seam

I recently took an online course in Landscape Quilting by Gloria Loughman – see review of her book here. She is Australian so when she mentioned Steam-A-Seam, I thought perhaps it was an Australian product. Imagine my delight to find that Alvina had it in stock and knew exactly what it was. I asked her about using Steam-A-Seam and below you’ll find her answer.

Sweet Pea Quilting sells Steam-A-Seam by the meter.

Sweet Pea Quilting sells Steam-A-Seam by the meter.

There are numerous types of this product available. Some work better than others.

I prefer Steam-A-Seam Lite 2 for two specific reasons.

  1. You can temporarily affix it to your project, put your project up on a display wall and the pieces will not fall off. That is not the case for a few other varieties on the market, they do not temporarily stick to your project.
  2. Steam A Seam Lite 2  is also very thin. So if your project has numerous layers of fusible webbing in one section, it does not become too stiff. So for example if you were appliqueing a bird, you would have numerous colours or shades of colours and some would overlap the other. Other products are thicker so your project gets bulkier and then does not lay flat. Too bulky making quilting it a bit difficult too as the threads will break if you are going through too many layers.
By Gloria Loughman - The layers and contours are made possible by the use of Steam-A-Seam.

By Gloria Loughman – The layers and contours are made possible by the use of Steam-A-Seam.

A tip from Alvina:
Since all Fusible Webbing does not apply the same , have the same shelf life or are the same thickness, keep a label that identifies which brand and type you are using. That way, when you go to use it, your entire project will finish the same. If you mix and match with scraps you have at home you never know what the end result will be.

I decided to try this product last weekend. A friend had received a new-to-her Pfaff sewing machine for Christmas and needed a refresher course in using it. It was several steps up from her last machine. After introducing her to various functions of the machine, we decided to make some tote bags.  You can imagine the fun – us sitting side by side with our machines, cutting, ironing and sewing these bags.

Never content to do something simple when something decorative is possible and because the fabric was just a bit short, I decided to do a special appliqued pocket. I cut a section of the paisley form from the fabric, using Steam-A-Seam to apply it to the pocket, ironed it in place and then sewed around it. To make it further complicated, I did two rows of couching with coordinated fabric around the outside, a decorative metallic stitch pattern in between and then added a bit of metallic thread to the paisley form.

Close-up of applique using Steam-A-Seam

Close-up of applique using Steam-A-Seam

We lined our bags in whatever was available in my stash – orange for me and beige for my friend and added buttons. I’ve mentioned these buttons before – they are hand-made ceramic buttons from ceramic artist, Molly Magid (www.missionclayworks.com). Each year when she sells at the Christmas market, I stock up.

Somewhat the worse for wear after a long day of sewing and tea drinking, I hold bags for both of us.

Somewhat the worse for wear after a long day of sewing and tea drinking, I hold bags for both of us.

You’ll always receive a warm welcome at Sweet Pea Quilting. Come in and ask Alvina about your project and how you can incorporate Steam-A-Seam.

 

 

 

 

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